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POLY TECHNOLOGIES AKS-762 7.62X39 (NEW IN BOX)
This one is New in Box, and hard to find. With a Folding Spike Bayonet, 16.5"  chrome lined barrel.
NEW IN BOX


 
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POLY TECH "SPIKER" BAYONET
Price: $3,850.00

Product Code: CW-90119
Qty:

Technical Specs Extended Information
 

Poly Tech AKS-762 7.62X39 Rifle. This one is New in Box, with a Folding Spike Bayonet and a 16.5" chrome lined barrel. The Spiker bayonet models were imported from 88-89. Poly Technologies commercial firearms were made to Chinese military specs. This one is marked "386" and the serial number starts with CW meaning it was from plant that manufactured the Poly Tech rifles. The importer was KFS Atlanta, Georgia. Chrome lined threaded barrel, Muzzle brake, wood stock, 3-30 round magazines, oil battle, Cleaning Kit in stock, green canvas military sling, Factory Owners Manual, with the factory box. Box does show some age but it is all there.

This is a rare rifle that will continue to increase in value. Serious collectors will have one of these in their collections.

WEB ARTICLE ABOUT THESE RIFLES.

During 1988-1989, Poly Technologies from China made the Rolls Royce of AK-47s, the AKS-762. These carbines were hand-crafted to Chinese military specifications and easily had the best quality of any AK-47 made before or since. All parts were then carefully polished before the high luster bluing was applied. The wooden furniture was nicely finished blonde hardwood, and metal side-folding and under-folding stocks were also available. These Poly Tech AK-47s were expensive at the time — $550 MSR compared to the typical $275-$295 for a good used one manufactured in Eastern Europe.
Even so, sales were encouraging until they were banned in 1989 by the Bush ban following the mass murder in Stockton, Calif., where the gunman used an AK-47 to kill all six of his victims, in addition to injuring 29. As a result, Poly Tech AK-47s and variations were only imported for two years, and these models in mint original condition are getting harder to find and more expensive every year.
Fortunately, (THE AUTHOR OF THIS ARTICLE) I have had the opportunity to shoot both the semi-auto and full-auto versions of the AK-47. Compared to the other machine guns brought to the range that day, the AK-47 chugged away methodically with its distinctive cadence due to the relatively low cyclic rate (approx. 600 rounds per minute). Compared to the much faster cycling rate of the M16 (up to 900 rounds/minute) and ultra-fast rapid fire of a MAC-10 or MP5, it was a pleasant surprise not having a 30-shot mag. go empty within a second or two. Five or six individual bursts were actually possible and firing it was very controllable. The AK-47's slower but effective rate of fire actually translates into fewer rounds of ammunition that need to be carried by the experienced user (good or bad) since it isn't an ammo hog in full-auto mode. It also never jammed or had a malfunction of any type, which is more than could be said for most of the other full-auto ordnance, after it was "warmed up."
Manufactured in China by Poly Technologies Inc., the AKS-762 is the semi-auto version of the Chinese AKM (Type-56) assault rifle. The Poly Tech ASK-762 features an ordinance-grade barrel carefully inspected to ensure that it meets stringent military specifications. The bore and gas piston are hard chromed to resist corrosion and extend service life. Like the Legend, all critical components have been specially heat treated for superior strength. Other features include enlarged safety and magazine release levers which also offer considerably smoother operation. The trigger mechanism retains the original AK-47 type "double hook" design for maximum safety and reliability, yet reduces trigger overtravel and offers smoother engagement with less "creep".
As a comparison, the average price of an ounce of gold in 1989 was $381 — now it's currently at approximately $1,650, an increase of over 325 percent. The Moral to this story is? Simple — some Poly Tech AK-47 variations have turned out to be better investments than almost any other firearm, and they have even outperformed gold during this time period!
One thing is for sure: If anybody would have told me back then that I'd be writing about the old-world quality of Chinese-made AK-47s and how well they've performed as investments 25 years later, I would have bet a lot of my Brownings and Winchesters against it!
AKS 7.62 X 39mm
Manufactured in China by Poly Technologies Inc., the AKS-762 is the semi-auto version of the Chinese AKM (Type-56) assault rifle. The Poly Tech ASK-762 features an ordinance-grade barrel carefully inspected to ensure that it meets stringent military specifications. The bore and gas piston are hard chromed to resist corrosion and extend service life. Like the Legend, all critical components have been specially heat treated for superior strength. Other features include enlarged safety and magazine release levers which also offer considerably smoother operation. The trigger mechanism retains the original AK-47 type "double hook" design for maximum safety and reliability, yet reduces trigger overtravel and offers smoother engagement with less "creep".
Specifications for the AKS 7.62 x 39mm
Caliber: 7.62 X 39mm (Soviet)
Weight: 8.4 lbs. (Empty)
Barrel: 16 2/5 in. Chrome Lined Bore and Chamber. Cold Hammer forged.
Rifling: Four lands and grooves. RH twist, one turn in 240mm/9.45 in.
Length: Overall 34 3/8 in. (Wood Stock) 34 5/8 (Side Folder)
Receiver: Stamped Receiver
If John M. Browning was alive today and could only spend a couple of minutes inspecting an AK-47 compared to its American counterpart, the AR-15, there is no doubt in this writer's mind that he would choose the AK-47. With Mikhail Kalashnikov's rifle design, it emulates the simplicity and reliability of Browning's M1911 semi-auto pistol design.
This configuration's popularity, made famous in Eastern Europe after WWII, was followed in Asia as the Cold War warmed up, and it remains the weapon of choice in many countries today for both military/LE forces, as well as insurgents and rebels. Ever seen a Middle East terrorist holding up an AR-15 in defiance? So how can the AK-47 — short for Automatic Kalashnikov carbine/rifle introduced in 1947 — that has been mass-produced by the millions in over 20 countries by a multitude of military arsenals become collectible in America?
While imported in very limited quantities before 1965, most U.S. military collectors were not that enamored with the clumsy-looking AK-47 with the mediocre build quality and a noisy outside control lever for safe, semi-auto — similar to a Remington Model 8 — and full-auto modes on select fire models. That all changed with America's involvement in the Vietnam War from 1962-1975. The U.S. Army, supplied with the new Colt M16s — select fire, gas operated in 5.56 NATO — was experiencing quite a few problems from the fouling that resulted from the non-chrome lined barrels and the dirty burning powder of the ordnance-supplied 5.56 NATO ammunition.
It didn't take long to figure out that the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong, armed with select fire AK-47s, had a better infantry weapon because of how it performed in a wide variety of combat conditions compared to the problematic M16s. With a simple but robust design, reliable and effective firepower, as well as ease of maintenance in the field, the AK-47 proved to be a fierce adversary during the thousands of firefights in Vietnam. Even though the use of enemy weapons was strictly prohibited by the Army, some U.S. special services forces were authorized to use enemy equipment, including AK-47s, in the field. The problem was the telltale sound of the AK-47's 600-round cyclic rate would usually draw fire from U.S. troops in the area, regardless if an American was firing it.
While it might have lacked the power and accuracy of the M16, it more than made up for these shortcomings in its ease of use, cost, reliability, and readily available parts. After the Vietnam War ended, most Americans knew what an AK-47 was, and a small but emerging AK-47 marketplace predicated on inexpensive pricing ($200-$250) began flourishing. Most of the new demand was for its reliable shooting value, as almost nobody was using these "assault rifles" as a sporting weapon, let alone taking one out into the north woods in an attempt to gun down Bambi.
The updated AKM, released in 1959, featured a stamped receiver and slanted muzzle brake. It was also approximately 33 percent lighter than the older AK-47. Today, there are far more model AKM in America than the older semi-auto AK-47s.
Today's AK-47 marketplace is a lot more complicated when considering how many military arsenals manufactured them, including Russia, China, Romania, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria, and even Egypt. In addition to these original carbines, there are also arsenal reworks, non-original parts guns assembled from a variety of arsenals, upgrades, and a variety of alterations. Almost anything is possible when looking at an AK-style carbine/rifle these days — caveat emptor!


Features
  • This one is marked "386" and the serial number starts with CW meaning it was from that plant. The importer was KFS Atlanta, Georgia. Chrome lined threaded barrel, Muzzle brake, wood stock, 3-30 round magazines, oil battle, Cleaning Kit in stock, green canvas military sling, Factory Owners Manual, with the factory box. Box does show some age but it is all there.

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